Saturday, February 28, 2009

Book Review - The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

A tad overrated, but still worth the read.

What a dismal and depressing state of affairs The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time turns out to be. Heavy-heartedness for the obvious struggles and emotional deficits of the main character, and narrator, suffering from Asperger Syndrome, were a harsh enlightenment. Then to add the lamentable fact that his parents would never feel emotion from their only son was crushing. But truly the most distressing aspect was that in a system where young Christopher had been brainwashed to believe in the horrors of ‘Stranger Danger,’ not unlike most kids in today’s society, it was only too obvious that it was the people closest to him that offered the most clear and present danger, and that instead it was a stranger that afforded him safety.

Though Haddon had an interesting and fresh concept in this one, I did find it a little slow at times, especially with the detailing of math equations. That being said, it was obviously affective and gave a better understanding and depth into our protagonist and his obsessive and genius-like behaviours.

By the anti-climactic end I realized that the story reminded me of Dustin Hoffman’s character in Rain Man, and how I had the same feelings of perpetual melancholy when I watched that many moons ago. My heart goes out to all families dealing with any form of autism, because God knows it takes super-human strength to deal with it at all, never mind well.

3/5 Snakes

2 comments:

  1. I thought itn was highly overrated. For me it was readable and so, so.

    Have you heard about the new game over at Suey's of It's All About Books?
    http://sueysbooks.blogspot.com/2009/02/bookword-game-voting-results-and-new.html

    The word for this book for me would be the winning word of the game this week, RecommenDUD! LOL!

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  2. LOL, that's perfect! I have a couple of others that this word would apply to. It always amazes me how well some books do in the mainstream, when I can barely get through them.

    ReplyDelete